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USPTO Terms of Art — J to K

Glossary of USPTO Terms of Art

| A | B | C-CL | CM-CZ | D-DIM | DIM-DZ | E | F | G | H | I | J-K | L | M-MET | MET-MZ | N | O | P-PHA | PHE-PON | POR-PZ | Q | R | S-SEPA | SEPO-SMT | SN-STEM | STEP-SZ | T-TOG | TON-TZ | U | V | W | X-Z |

J-LEAD (CLASS 257)
A rolled-under, J-shaped configuration of some surface mounted component leads.

JACKET (CLASS 313)
Same as casing above.

JACKET (CLASS 412)
A protective structure, e.g., dust cover, assembled to but not fastened to a completed book(*).

JAW (CLASS 269)
(a) One of the plural portions of a work holder couple which engages or grips a workpiece. Generally, the jaw is taken to include the work contacting surface and that part of the holder which (1) is contiguous to said surface as well as that portion which (2) if moveable, moves bodily in congruent fashion with said surface. (See subclass 271 for the definition of a jaw attachment or insert). (b) A work holder portion with an underlying work contacting surface, for which see subclass 289, especially (2) Note, is not considered to be a jaw, unless claimed in combination as one of plural coacting work gripping elements. However, a work holder portion with an overlying work contacting surface, which portion ordinarily is incapable of functioning as a work holder in the absence of a coacting underlying support means, will be considered as a jaw even if there is no claimed reference to said coacting underlying portion. (See subclasses 37-45 for plural holders which separately hold at least two workpieces relative to each other; each such holder is considered to be more than a jaw). (c) As an exception to (a) which states that a "jaw" must be one of a couple; a work engaging member, which as claimed (1) includes plural, abutting, nonparallel, flat work engaging surfaces; (2) each such flat surface, coacting with a different one of plural work engaging elements as one of a plurality of work engaging elements as one of a plurality of work holding couples, is considered to be a common jaw member cooperating with a plurality of jaws. (See subclass 104 for patents to a holder with plural jaws coacting with a common angle-corner jaw to hold the same workpiece). (See subclass 154 for patents to a holder with plural jaws coacting with a common flat jaw surface to hold work or workpieces). (d) Unlike (c) above, a work engaging member which as claimed includes either (1) plural, nonabutting, work engaging surfaces or (2) plural, abutting, curved, work engaging surfaces, and which surfaces (1) or (2) each coact with a different one of plural work engaging elements, is not considered to be a "common" jaw member. Hence, such a configured work engaging member in combination with coacting plural elements does not constitute plural jaw pairs either for subclass 104 or subclass 152. (See subclasses 257-284 for specific jaw features, per se.) The following figure is illustrative of plural, nonabutting, work engaging surfaces B1 and B2 referred to in (d)(1) above. > The following figure is illustrative of plural abutting, curved, work engaging surfaces E1, E2 and E3 referred to in (d)(2) above. > (e) Each of three mutually adjustable* and/or actuable* work contacting elements effective to hold work (as in subclass 156) is also considered to be a jaw. In both rotational and rectilinear movement, the movement may be in steps, backwards, or forwards.

JFET (CLASS 438)
junction field effect transistor (junction gate)

JOFET (CLASS 438)
Josephson junction field effect transistor

JOINT (CLASS 403)
A connection between two or more members which utilizes an intrinsic property of at least one of the members or wherein the members are related to each other in a particular manner.

JOINT (CLASS 404)
(1) Structure linking or uniting adjacent components, or (2) a gap between adjacent components or (3) a parting member or spacer between adjacent components.

JOSEPHSON EFFECT (CLASS 505)
The passage of paired electrons (Cooper pairs) through a weak connection (Josephson junction) between superconductors as in the tunnel passage of paired electrons through a thin dielectric layer separating two superconductors.

JOSEPHSON JUNCTION (CLASS 505)
A weak connection between superconductors through which the Josephson effect is realized.

JOURNAL (SEE ALSO LOG) (CLASS 707)
A historical record of transactions and activities related to the database or file system.

JTE (CLASS 438)
junction termination extension

JUNCTION (CLASS 257)
A joining of two different semiconductors or of a semiconductor and a metal at an interface. Types of junctions include HETEROJUNCTIONS, SCHOTTKY BARRIER JUNCTIONS, and PN JUNCTIONS.

JUNCTION BARRIER (CLASS 257)
The opposition to the diffusion of majority carriers across a pn junction due to the charge of the fixed donor and acceptor ions.

JUNCTION BARRIER (CLASS 438)
The opposition to the diffusion of majority carriers across a pn junction due to the charge of the fixed donor and acceptor ions.

JUNCTION CAPACITANCE (CLASS 257)
The capacitance across a pn junction. It depends on the width of the depletion layer, which increases with increased reverse bias voltage across the junction.

JUNCTION CAPACITANCE (CLASS 438)
The capacitance across a pn junction. It depends on the width of the depletion layer, which increases with increased reverse bias voltage across the junction.

JUNCTION GATE FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTOR (JFET) (CLASS 257)
See FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTOR.

JUNCTION IN A TRANSISTOR OR SEMI-CONDUCTOR (CLASS 330)
The boundary of P-type and N-type semiconductor material.

JUNCTION ISOLATION (CLASS 257)
Electrical isolation of devices on a monolithic integrated circuit chip using a reverse biased junction diode to establish a depletion layer that forms the electrical isolation between devices.

JUNCTION ISOLATION (CLASS 438)
Electrical isolation of devices on a monolithic integrated circuit chip using a reverse biased junction diode to establish a depletion layer that forms the electrical isolation between devices.

JUNCTION RESISTANCE (CLASS 257)
The electrical resistance across a semiconductor PN junction.

JUNCTION RESISTANCE (CLASS 438)
The electrical resistance across a semiconductor PN junction.

JUNCTION TRANSISTOR (CLASS 330)
A transistor comprising two P-N Junctions back-to-back wherein a region of P- or N-type semiconductor material is common to both junctions (thus determining an NPN or a PNP junction transistor, respectively); an emitter electrode connected to one of the conductivity regions not common to the two junctions, normally forwardly biased (positive terminal of bias means to emitter for PNP type and negative terminal for NPN type); a collector electrode connected to the other conductivity region but common to the two junctions, reversely biased (negative terminal of bias means for the PNP type and positive terminal for the NPN type; and a base electrode connected to the region common to both junctions. See definition of Point Contact Transistor, which operates similarly in many respects.

JUNCTION, SEMICONDUCTOR (CLASS 117)
The region of transition between semiconduction regions of different electrical properties, usually between p-type and n-type materials, and usually a junction exhibits asymmetric conductivity.

JUSTIFICATION (CLASS 234)
The computation or assignment of interword-spaces and/or type-widths, or symbols representative of such spaces or type-widths, in connection with the composition of a line of type or the production of an instrumentality (perforated tape, etc.) for the control of a type-setting machine, for the purpose of predetermining the exact length of a completed line of type.

KEEPER (CLASS 070)
A part to receive the movable portion of a bolt usually a socket, pocket, opening, ledge, abutment, seat, shoulder, etc.

KEEPER (CLASS 402)
An element or mechanism which cooperates with a sheet retainer to releasably secure a sheet* thereon.

KETONE (CLASS 520)
Denotes an organic compound having the general structure n (n is 1 or more) and wherein the carbon atoms bonded to the n group are not double bonded to oxygen, sulfur, selenium, or tellurium. Ketone as used throughout includes ketene, i.e., CH2=C=O

KETONE (INCLUDING KETENE) (CLASS 514)
Denotes an organic compound having the general structure -C-[C(=O)]n -C- (n is 1 or more) and wherein the carbon atoms bonded to the-[C(=O)]n group are not double bonded to oxygen, sulfur, selenium, or tellurium. Ketone as used throughout includes ketene.

KEY (CLASS 070)
A specially contrived implement for controlling or operating a lock and (1) having portions designed to pass fixed obstructions or to arrange movable impediments to allow operation of a securing device, or (2) embodying an unconventional design of predetermined secret or nonpublic origin.

KEY (CLASS 380)
A formula, word or signal used to define the code in encryption or decryption of the information. Such a signal is often a digital signal having a predetermined or pseudorandom content.

KEY (CLASS 400)
An element on a typewriter, located on a key-board*, which element is pressed to cause either (a) the actuation of a type-member* to imprint a character* that corresponds to the selected key, or (b) the actuation of a selected function* of the typewriter. In a manual typewriter a key is usually pressed by a finger of a user, and the movement of the selected key is transmitted via a system of levers and links into movement of a corresponding type-member actuator or function actuator. In some typewriters and external power source assists the actuation. In other typewriters keys are pressed successively in response to signals to the typewriter by a human or mechanical operator. The key referred to in (a) above (i.e., a character key) also causes a character-space* movement of the carriage* as well as actuation of the type-member.

KEY (CLASS 705)
A formula, word or signal used to define a code in encryption or decryption of the information. Such a signal is often a digital signal having a predetermined or pseudorandom content

KEY-BOARD (CLASS 400)
That portion of a typewriter which is located so as to face and be adjacent to the user of a typewriter, and containing the key* elements that are to be pressed in succession to produce a text that is being typed, or pressed as needed to actuate a particular function* of the typewriter.

KEYSTONING (CLASS 348)
A distorted scanning pattern, with a top wider than the bottom or vice versa, produced when the electron beam in the television camera tube is at angle with the principal axis of the tube.

KLYSTRON (CLASS 331)
A beam tube including at least two apertured cavity resonators, the beam of charged particles passing through the apertures of the resonators in succession, and a collector electrode being provided to intercept the beam after passing through the resonators. The first resonator causes bunching of the particles passing therethrough, the bunched particles then travel in a field-free region where further bunching occurs and then the bunched particles enter the second resonator giving up their energy to excite it into oscillations.

KMER (CLASS 438)
Kodak metal etch resist

KNEADING (CLASS 425)
Working a material by intermittent squeezing and relieving a semi-solid material such as dough, rubber, etc. Synonym: BRAKING

KPR (CLASS 438)
Kodak photo resist

KTFR (CLASS 438)
Kodak thin film resist

| A | B | C-CL | CM-CZ | D-DIM | DIM-DZ | E | F | G | H | I | J-K | L | M-MET | MET-MZ | N | O | P-PHA | PHE-PON | POR-PZ | Q | R | S-SEPA | SEPO-SMT | SN-STEM | STEP-SZ | T-TOG | TON-TZ | U | V | W | X-Z |

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